Wednesday opening hours

10:00 - 20:00

Last entry one hour before

   

Opening Times

Mon – Tue – Wed – Thur and Sun 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Fri and Sat 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
(Last entry one hour before)

Info & Booking

www.ticketea.com
902 044 226

El Palacio de Gaviria

Exhibition

Section 5: Illusion and Dreamscape

The belief in the intoxicating and liberating power of the imagination and of dreams was a key concept for the Surrealists. Their dreamscapes evoke a sense of mystery, challenging our perception of reality through the juxtaposition of unconnected objects, often set within landscapes in which time and space are distorted. As in dreams, memory, and space travel, reality blends with the imagination. In the 1924 Surrealist Manifesto, André Breton states: “I believe in the future resolution of these two states, dream and reality, which are seemingly so contradictory, into a kind of absolute reality, a surreality.”
The dream-like images created by the Surrealists reflect the influence of Sigmund Freud’s ground-breaking publication, The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), in which dreams are seen as a window into the unconscious. For the artists of this period, dreams represented a territory in which judgements and reason are suspended.
A particularly influential figure, in this respect, was Giorgio de Chirico, the founder of Metaphysical painting. Fascinated with obscurity, melancholy, and the elusiveness of reality, de Chirico created timeless cityscapes which convey a sense of unease through the manipulation of perspective. René Magritte’s poetic inventions are seemingly simple images replete with complex associations. His visual metaphors reflect a mastery of the dramatic and the shocking. Both Magritte and Salvador Dalí exhibited unusual technical virtuosity; this allowed them to create tangible illusions that blur the border between reality and fantasy.
The fusion of images in an illusory space became popular in Surrealist photography as well: photomontage combines multiple images in a single photograph. Using a medium usually perceived as “real and reliable,” Herbert Bayer challenged viewers by defying gravity and space. Like other artists, Bayer often used eyes as recurring symbols of voyeurism and the power of inner vision.
Dreams are perhaps best captured in cinema. Using montage, double exposure, and dissolve, Surrealist films evoke a hallucinatory state and equate the process of film-making with dreaming.

Una exposición organizada por:

Con:

En colaboración con:

Comunicación y prensa:

   

Wednesday opening hours

10:00 - 20:00

Last entry one hour before

Exhibition

Section 5: Illusion and Dreamscape

The belief in the intoxicating and liberating power of the imagination and of dreams was a key concept for the Surrealists. Their dreamscapes evoke a sense of mystery, challenging our perception of reality through the juxtaposition of unconnected objects, often set within landscapes in which time and space are distorted. As in dreams, memory, and space travel, reality blends with the imagination. In the 1924 Surrealist Manifesto, André Breton states: “I believe in the future resolution of these two states, dream and reality, which are seemingly so contradictory, into a kind of absolute reality, a surreality.”
The dream-like images created by the Surrealists reflect the influence of Sigmund Freud’s ground-breaking publication, The Interpretation of Dreams (1900), in which dreams are seen as a window into the unconscious. For the artists of this period, dreams represented a territory in which judgements and reason are suspended.
A particularly influential figure, in this respect, was Giorgio de Chirico, the founder of Metaphysical painting. Fascinated with obscurity, melancholy, and the elusiveness of reality, de Chirico created timeless cityscapes which convey a sense of unease through the manipulation of perspective. René Magritte’s poetic inventions are seemingly simple images replete with complex associations. His visual metaphors reflect a mastery of the dramatic and the shocking. Both Magritte and Salvador Dalí exhibited unusual technical virtuosity; this allowed them to create tangible illusions that blur the border between reality and fantasy.
The fusion of images in an illusory space became popular in Surrealist photography as well: photomontage combines multiple images in a single photograph. Using a medium usually perceived as “real and reliable,” Herbert Bayer challenged viewers by defying gravity and space. Like other artists, Bayer often used eyes as recurring symbols of voyeurism and the power of inner vision.
Dreams are perhaps best captured in cinema. Using montage, double exposure, and dissolve, Surrealist films evoke a hallucinatory state and equate the process of film-making with dreaming.

Opening Times

Mon – Tue – Wed – Thur and Sun 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Fri and Sat 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
(Last entry one hour before)

Info & Booking

www.ticketea.com
902 044 226

El Palacio de Gaviria

Una exposición organizada por:

Con:

En colaboración con:

Comunicación y prensa:

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