Monday opening hours

10:00 - 20:00

Last entry one hour before

   

Opening Times

Mon – Tue – Wed – Thur and Sun 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Fri and Sat 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
(Last entry one hour before)

Info & Booking

www.ticketea.com
902 044 226

El Palacio de Gaviria

Exhibition

Section 4: Biomorphism and Metamorphosis

Biomorphism reflects the Surrealist preference for ambiguous and organic forms. This predilection lies at the origin of paintings, sculptures and reliefs inspired by natural phenomena: anatomical, astronomical, and botanical subjects. Merging figurative elements and abstraction, Jean (Hans) Arp and Yves Tanguy developed a “biomorphic” language.
Arp simplified the forms of nature by stripping them down to their abstract essence. His biomorphic works capture and express the vital energy of existence, freeing art from the constraints imposed by civilization. Yves Tanguy’s paintings combine animal, plant and human figures with rock formations, giving rise to evanescent landscapes. During the Second World War and in its aftermath, these landscapes became increasingly barren and afflicted, offering a compelling psychological portrayal of Europe in those years.
Surrealism assigned considerable value to magic, transformation, and hybridization. In the 1920s, the movement was influenced by Picasso’s use of metamorphosis, as witnessed by the subjects and technique that André Masson adopted for his figurative as well as more abstract and automatic works.
Metamorphosis illustrates the power of the individual imagination to transcend reality and reason in order to access the realm of wonder. The myths of Native American and Pacific cultures provided models of uncensored expression and images of human-plant metamorphosis. Drawing inspiration from non-Western cultures, alchemy and other occult phenomena, Max Ernst came to the conclusion that the artist must re-establish the mythical and spiritual harmony with nature that has been lost through Christianity, rationalism and Western technology.
Victor Brauner further explored the occult and mysticism: his art represents the merging of a vast range of cultures, myths and religious beliefs. Focusing on figurative representations – whether of human beings, animals or mythical figures – Brauner develops a complex vocabulary of symbolic forms.

Una exposición organizada por:

Con:

En colaboración con:

Comunicación y prensa:

   

Monday opening hours

10:00 - 20:00

Last entry one hour before

Exhibition

Section 4: Biomorphism and Metamorphosis

Biomorphism reflects the Surrealist preference for ambiguous and organic forms. This predilection lies at the origin of paintings, sculptures and reliefs inspired by natural phenomena: anatomical, astronomical, and botanical subjects. Merging figurative elements and abstraction, Jean (Hans) Arp and Yves Tanguy developed a “biomorphic” language.
Arp simplified the forms of nature by stripping them down to their abstract essence. His biomorphic works capture and express the vital energy of existence, freeing art from the constraints imposed by civilization. Yves Tanguy’s paintings combine animal, plant and human figures with rock formations, giving rise to evanescent landscapes. During the Second World War and in its aftermath, these landscapes became increasingly barren and afflicted, offering a compelling psychological portrayal of Europe in those years.
Surrealism assigned considerable value to magic, transformation, and hybridization. In the 1920s, the movement was influenced by Picasso’s use of metamorphosis, as witnessed by the subjects and technique that André Masson adopted for his figurative as well as more abstract and automatic works.
Metamorphosis illustrates the power of the individual imagination to transcend reality and reason in order to access the realm of wonder. The myths of Native American and Pacific cultures provided models of uncensored expression and images of human-plant metamorphosis. Drawing inspiration from non-Western cultures, alchemy and other occult phenomena, Max Ernst came to the conclusion that the artist must re-establish the mythical and spiritual harmony with nature that has been lost through Christianity, rationalism and Western technology.
Victor Brauner further explored the occult and mysticism: his art represents the merging of a vast range of cultures, myths and religious beliefs. Focusing on figurative representations – whether of human beings, animals or mythical figures – Brauner develops a complex vocabulary of symbolic forms.

Opening Times

Mon – Tue – Wed – Thur and Sun 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Fri and Sat 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
(Last entry one hour before)

Info & Booking

www.ticketea.com
902 044 226

El Palacio de Gaviria

Una exposición organizada por:

Con:

En colaboración con:

Comunicación y prensa:

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