Opening Times

Mon – Tue – Wed – Thur and Sun 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Fri and Sat 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
(Last entry one hour before)

Info & Booking

www.ticketea.com
902 044 226

El Palacio de Gaviria

Exhibition

Section 3: Automatism and its Evolution

Aiming to rejuvenate poetry and the visual arts by drawing on untapped sources of creativity, Surrealism explored the obscure aspects of the mind: dreams, mental illness, and the unconscious. Writers and artists developed “automatic” techniques to escape conscious control and tap into the sources of their unconscious. Automatism reflects the Surrealists’ passion for the new discoveries made in the psychiatric field at the turn of the 20th century: they saw automatism as the visual counterpart to the free association used by Freud in psychoanalysis. 
According to André Breton, the essence of automatism lies in keeping “the voices … of our unconscious” alert and in the attempt to escape the conscious control of logic, aesthetic or morality – the sworn enemies of the imagination and of creativity. The Surrealists strove to expand the mind by regaining that freedom of the imagination which people usually only have access to during childhood, in dreams, or in moments of madness. The role of reason must be limited to the acknowledgement and recording of the magnificent phenomena produced by the unconscious. 
The Surrealist search for processes capable of freeing art from conscious thought translates into various techniques and forms of art, including the “automatic drawings” of Jean Arp and André Masson, the semi-automatic works of Joan Miró, and the frottages (rubbings) and grattages (scrapings) of Max Ernst. Man Ray and other photographers developed techniques such as solarization, photograms and chance effects to create works filled with mystery and ambiguity. 
In the 1940s, when many leading representatives of the movement were forced into exile by the Second World War, automatism became a driving force for the artists of the New York school. Struck by the idea of the unconscious as a source of artistic inspiration, these future Abstract Expressionists broadened the repertoire of automatic practices.

Una exposición organizada por:

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En colaboración con:

Comunicación y prensa:

   

Exhibition

Section 3: Automatism and its Evolution

Aiming to rejuvenate poetry and the visual arts by drawing on untapped sources of creativity, Surrealism explored the obscure aspects of the mind: dreams, mental illness, and the unconscious. Writers and artists developed “automatic” techniques to escape conscious control and tap into the sources of their unconscious. Automatism reflects the Surrealists’ passion for the new discoveries made in the psychiatric field at the turn of the 20th century: they saw automatism as the visual counterpart to the free association used by Freud in psychoanalysis. 
According to André Breton, the essence of automatism lies in keeping “the voices … of our unconscious” alert and in the attempt to escape the conscious control of logic, aesthetic or morality – the sworn enemies of the imagination and of creativity. The Surrealists strove to expand the mind by regaining that freedom of the imagination which people usually only have access to during childhood, in dreams, or in moments of madness. The role of reason must be limited to the acknowledgement and recording of the magnificent phenomena produced by the unconscious. 
The Surrealist search for processes capable of freeing art from conscious thought translates into various techniques and forms of art, including the “automatic drawings” of Jean Arp and André Masson, the semi-automatic works of Joan Miró, and the frottages (rubbings) and grattages (scrapings) of Max Ernst. Man Ray and other photographers developed techniques such as solarization, photograms and chance effects to create works filled with mystery and ambiguity. 
In the 1940s, when many leading representatives of the movement were forced into exile by the Second World War, automatism became a driving force for the artists of the New York school. Struck by the idea of the unconscious as a source of artistic inspiration, these future Abstract Expressionists broadened the repertoire of automatic practices.

Opening Times

Mon – Tue – Wed – Thur and Sun 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Fri and Sat 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
(Last entry one hour before)

Info & Booking

www.ticketea.com
902 044 226

El Palacio de Gaviria

Una exposición organizada por:

Con:

En colaboración con:

Comunicación y prensa:

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