Opening Times

Mon – Tue – Wed – Thur and Sun 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Fri and Sat 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
(Last entry one hour before)

Info & Booking

www.ticketea.com
902 044 226

El Palacio de Gaviria

Exhibition

Section 1: Desire: Muse and Abused

For Surrealist artists and poets, the theme of desire represented an avenue for exploring unconscious fantasies, fears and inhibitions. The aim of releasing desires through art is connected to the rise of totalitarian regimes and the outbreak of the two World Wars: in this context libido turned into a revolutionary force, a means of rebelling against political and social censorship. 
In the late 1920s the theme of desire became a sort of obsession and Freud’s theories on sexuality were circulating within the movement, turning artists and writers into “agents of desire.” Woman, perceived as a source of inspiration, embodied both a promise and a symbol of power. The passive figure of the femme-enfant (the woman-child) proved particularly attractive on account of its double nature, simultaneously naive and seductive. The Surrealists had a patriarchal view of the fairer sex: “We shall be masters of ourselves, masters of women, and of love” (Surrealist Manifesto, 1924). This aggrandizement of desire had its roots in the ideas of the Marquis de Sade, a French aristocrat of the 18th century who regarded the release of passions as an inalienable right of man. 
The female body became the centrepiece of many Surrealist paintings, photographs, collages, and sculptures: idealized and mystified, or destroyed and fragmented, it became the passive object of an act of desire. Collages and montages offered a platform to dissect, recompose, or disfigure the female image. By using woman as a way to project anxieties and unresolved conflicts, these artists – and especially Hans Bellmer – analyzed the most taboo aspects of desire. 
André Breton considered the physical reaction to art akin to erotic pleasure: a form of elation that also reverberates through Man Ray’s photographs, in which the female muse takes the centre stage. Marcel Duchamp, by contrast, explored the erotic impulse through his female alter ego Rose Sélavy, examining gender boundaries and reinventing himself as an object of desire.

Una exposición organizada por:

Con:

En colaboración con:

Comunicación y prensa:

   

Exhibition

Section 1: Desire: Muse and Abused

For Surrealist artists and poets, the theme of desire represented an avenue for exploring unconscious fantasies, fears and inhibitions. The aim of releasing desires through art is connected to the rise of totalitarian regimes and the outbreak of the two World Wars: in this context libido turned into a revolutionary force, a means of rebelling against political and social censorship. 
In the late 1920s the theme of desire became a sort of obsession and Freud’s theories on sexuality were circulating within the movement, turning artists and writers into “agents of desire.” Woman, perceived as a source of inspiration, embodied both a promise and a symbol of power. The passive figure of the femme-enfant (the woman-child) proved particularly attractive on account of its double nature, simultaneously naive and seductive. The Surrealists had a patriarchal view of the fairer sex: “We shall be masters of ourselves, masters of women, and of love” (Surrealist Manifesto, 1924). This aggrandizement of desire had its roots in the ideas of the Marquis de Sade, a French aristocrat of the 18th century who regarded the release of passions as an inalienable right of man. 
The female body became the centrepiece of many Surrealist paintings, photographs, collages, and sculptures: idealized and mystified, or destroyed and fragmented, it became the passive object of an act of desire. Collages and montages offered a platform to dissect, recompose, or disfigure the female image. By using woman as a way to project anxieties and unresolved conflicts, these artists – and especially Hans Bellmer – analyzed the most taboo aspects of desire. 
André Breton considered the physical reaction to art akin to erotic pleasure: a form of elation that also reverberates through Man Ray’s photographs, in which the female muse takes the centre stage. Marcel Duchamp, by contrast, explored the erotic impulse through his female alter ego Rose Sélavy, examining gender boundaries and reinventing himself as an object of desire.

Opening Times

Mon – Tue – Wed – Thur and Sun 10.00 am – 8.00 pm
Fri and Sat 10.00 am – 9.00 pm
(Last entry one hour before)

Info & Booking

www.ticketea.com
902 044 226

El Palacio de Gaviria

Una exposición organizada por:

Con:

En colaboración con:

Comunicación y prensa:

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